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Keynote Lectures

State of the Art and Future Developments of Measurement Applications on Smartphones
Pasquale Daponte, University of Sannio, Italy

Real-Time Wireless Control Networks for Cyber-Physical Systems
Chenyang Lu, Washington University in St. Louis, United States

Verification and Performance Analysis of Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems using UPPAAL
Kim G. Larsen, Aalborg University, Denmark

A Tiny Laboratory under the Skin
Sandro Carrara, EPFL, Switzerland

Dielectric Waveguide Amplifiers and Lasers
Markus Pollnau, University of Twente, Netherlands

Physiological Computing for Outdoor Activities
António Câmara, YDreams, Portugal

Human Sensors - Perspectives on the Digital Self
Stephen Fairclough, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom

Security Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks
Utz Roedig, Lancaster University, United Kingdom

 

State of the Art and Future Developments of Measurement Applications on Smartphones

Pasquale Daponte
University of Sannio
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Pasquale Daponte obtained his bachelor's degree and master's degree "cum laude" in Electrical Engineering in 1981 from University of Naples, Italy. In 1983 he obtained the Assistant Professor degree in Electrical and Electronic Measurement at the University of Calabria (CS), Italy, and joined the Department of Electrical Engineering. Since 1989 he was Appointed Professor of Electronic Measurements. In 1992 he obtained the Associate Professor degree of Electronic Measurements, in the Faculty of Engineering - University of Calabria. Since 1994 he teaches Digital Signal Processing and Measurement Information at Faculty of Computer Engineering in Benevento, University of Sannio. Since 1999 he is a Full Professor of Electronic Measurements at University of Sannio. He is President of IMEKO (www.imeko.org). He is member of: AdCom of IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society; Editorial Board of the Measurement Journal - Elsevier Publisher; Past Editor of “IEEE 1658 Standard for Terminology and Test Methods of Digital-to-Analog Converter Devices”; Working Group for IEEE Std. P1696 on Terminology and Test Methods for Electronic Probes, IEEE Std. 181-2011 on “Transitions, Pulses, and Related Waveforms”, IEEE Std. IEEE 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders, IEEE Std.1241 “Standard for Terminology and Test Methods for Analog-to-Digital Converters”, IEEE Draft Std. “P1721 - Standard for Objective Measurement of Systemic Arterial Blood Pressure in Humans”, Project of a new IEEE Standard on Jitter Measurement; Working Group of the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technical Committee N°10 Subcommittee of the Waveform Measurements and Analysis Committee; SC IEC 47A “Interface integrated circuits - Dynamic criteria for Analogue-Digital Converters (ADC)”; IEC/TC85 “Measuring equipment for electrical and electromagnetic quantities”; MT 18 Revision of publications IEC 60469-1 and IEC 60649-2, CENCLC_JWGNAWI; Italian Electrical Engineering Association; Societas Internationalis pro Diagnostica Ultrasonica in Opthalmologia; Board of the Scientific Committee of the Italian Electrical and Electronic Measurements Association. He has organised several national or international meetings in the field of Electronic Measurements and European co-operation and he was General Chairman of the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technical Conference for 2006. He was co-Editor of several Proceedings and Special Issues on international Journals. He is Vice Rector for PhD and Post Mater Programmes of the University of Sannio. He is founder and Head of the Laboratory of Digital Signal Processing and Measurement Information at University of Sannio, Italy (http://lesim1.ing.unisannio.it). He organized and managed some research projects financial supported by international, national, and regional Institutions. These researches allowed some relevant collaborations with foreign Institutions and Industries to be activated. He has published more than 250 scientific papers in journals and at national and international conferences on the following subjects: Digital Signal Processing, Distributed Measurement Systems, ADC and DAC Modelling and Testing, Biomedical instrumentations. He is reviewer for many international journals and magazines, and other international scientific journals. He is cofounder of spin-off LabMep s.r.l.. He developed research activities for several Italian and foreign industries and he is owner of several patents. In 1987 he received from the Italian Society of Oftalmology (SOI) the prize SOI for the studies on the digital signal processing of the ultrasounds in echo-oftalmology. He received the Laurea Honoris Causa in Electrical Engineering from Technical University “Gheorghe Asachi" of Iasi (Romania).


Abstract
The modern smartphones contain different sensor technologies, so they can be used as stand-alone measurement instruments on a wide range of application domains. The presentation deals with a survey of measurement applications based on smartphones. In the first part, the evolution of mobile phone technologies, including the sensors and mobile networks developments, is presented. Then, in order to highlight the sensors and the communication capabilities, the architectural overview of the hardware and software technologies, which are available on latest series of smartphones, is reported and discussed. A review of measurements applications using the smart sensors and the communication interfaces available on smartphones, it is also presented. A classification of smartphone applications, which looks the smartphone as a handheld measurement instrument, is presented. In the last part, the integration of augmented reality to the measurement applications and new type of measurement systems, having a smartphone as processing support, is presented.



 

 

Real-Time Wireless Control Networks for Cyber-Physical Systems

Chenyang Lu
Washington University in St. Louis
United States
 

Brief Bio
Chenyang Lu is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. Professor Lu is Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks and Associate Editor of Real-Time Systems. He also serves as Program Chair of premier conferences such as IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS 2012), ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS 2012) and ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (SenSys 2014). Professor Lu is the author and co-author of over 100 research papers with over 10000 citations and an h-index of 45. He received the Ph.D. degree from University of Virginia in 2001, the M.S. degree from Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1997, and the B.S. degree from University of Science and Technology of China in 1995, all in computer science. His research interests include real-time systems, wireless sensor networks and cyber-physical systems.


Abstract
Wireless control systems represent a new frontier of cyber-physical systems. Rapid adoption of wireless sensing and actuation networking standards has demonstrated the feasibility of reliable wireless communication for industrial automation. However, wireless control networks face significant challenges in meeting real-time communication requirements of control systems. Furthermore, close coupling between control and communication requires a cyber-physical co-design approach to optimize control performance under stringent resources constraints. This talk will present recent advancements in real-time wireless control networks including (1) a new real-time wireless scheduling theory for fast real-time performance analysis of wireless control networks; (2) a scheduling-control co-design approach to optimizing the sampling rates of feedback control loops sharing a wireless control network; and (3) Wireless Cyber-Physical Simulator (WCPS), a holistic environment for realistic simulations of large-scale wireless control systems, as well as two case studies of wireless structural control for resilient civil infrastructure.



 

 

Verification and Performance Analysis of Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems using UPPAAL

Kim G. Larsen
Aalborg University
Denmark
 

Brief Bio
Kim Guldstrand Larsen is a full professor in computer science and director of the centre of embedded software systems (CISS). He received his Ph.D from Edinburgh University (Computer Science) 1986, is an honorary Doctor (Honoris causa) at Uppsala University 1999 and at Normal Superieure De Cachan, Paris 2007. He has also been an Industrial Professor in the Formal Methods and Tools Group, Twente University, The Netherlands. His research interests include modeling, verification, performance analysis of real-time and embedded systems with application and contributions to concurrency theory and model checking. In particular since 1995 he has been prime investigator of the tool UPPAAL and co-founder of the company UP4ALL International. He has published more than 230 publications in international journals and conferences as well as co-authored 6 software-tools, and is involved in a number of Danish and European projects on embedded and real-time systems. His H-index (according to Harzing’s publish or perish, January 2012) is 63. He is life-long member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, Copenhagen, and is member of the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences as well as member of Acedemia Europeae. Since January 2008 he has been member of the board of the Danish Independent Research Councils, as well as Danish National Expert for the European ICT-program.


Abstract
Timed automata, priced timed automata and energy automata have emerged as useful formalisms for modeling a real-time and energy-aware systems as found in several embedded and cyber-physical systems. Whereas the real-time model checker UPPAAL allows for efficient verification of hard timing constraints of timed automata, model checking of priced timed automata and energy automata are in general undecidable -- notable exception being cost-optimal reachability for priced timed automata as supported by the branch UPPAAL Cora. These obstacles are overcome by UPPAAL-SMC, the new highly scalable engine of UPPAAL, which supports (distributed) statistical model checking of stochastic hybrid systems with respect to weighted metric temporal logic. The talk will review UPPAAL-SMC and its applications to the domains of energy-harvesting wireless sensor networks, schedulability and execution time analysis for mixed criticality systems, battery-aware scheduling with respect to correctness, fault- and performance analysis. In the talk I will also indicate how UPPAAL SMC may play be of benefit for counter example generation, refinement checking, testing, controller synthesis and optimization.



 

 

A Tiny Laboratory under the Skin

Sandro Carrara
EPFL
Switzerland
 

Brief Bio
Sandro Carrara is a lecturer and scientist at the EPFL in Lausanne (Switzerland). He is former professor of optical and electrical biosensors at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Biophysics (DIBE) of the University of Genoa (Italy) and former professor of nanobiotechnology at the University of Bologna (Italy). He is founder and Editor-in-Chief of the journal BioNanoScience by Springer, Topical Editor of the IEEE Sensors Journal, and Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems. He is an IEEE member for the Circuit and System Society (CASS) and member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Sensors Council. He also has been recently appointed as CASS Distinguished Lecturers for the years 2013-2014. His scientific interests are on electrical phenomena of nano-bio-structured films, and include CMOS design of biochips based on proteins and DNA. He has more then 130 scientific publications and 10 patents. His work received a NATO Advanced Research Award in 1996 for the original contribution to the physics of single-electron conductivity in nano-particles, two Best Paper Awards at the IEEE PRIME Conference in 2010 (Berlin), and in 2009 (Cork), a Best Poster Award at the Nanotera workshop in 2011 (Bern), and a Best Poster Award at the NanoEurope Symposium in 2009 (Rapperswil). He also received the Best Referees Award from the journal Biosensor and Bioelectronics in 2006. He has been appointed as General Chairman of IEEE International Conference BioCAS 2014, that will be held in October 2014 in the new EPFL Conference Center.


Abstract
The development of Integrated electrochemical CMOS-Bio-Sensors [1] for diagnosis and/or treatment of patients with specific physiological conditions (e.g., heart, cardiovascular, cancer diseases) or convalescents is a key factor to provide better, more rationale, effective and ultimately low-cost health care also at home. The ultimate goal of improved health care on those subjects is the extension of the patients’ autonomy, the possibility for auto-monitoring, the improvement of their comfort levels and their integration into everyday life. On-line monitoring is also required in professionals and recreational sportsmen training, as well as in elderly and/or disabled citizen care and/or people involved in public utilities (e.g. the public-transportation drivers). For those, it is a key aspect the maintenance of their safety by through embedded systems to alert emergency services in the event of a potentially dangerous situation. Some systems for on-line monitoring are available in the market. They use wearable devices (accelerometers, heartbeat monitoring system, etc). However, all these systems do not measure the human metabolism at molecular level (metabolites). The only available real-time, implantable/wearable systems for metabolic control are limited to glucose monitoring and used only for diabetic patients. However, electrochemical sensors may address so many other molecules, which have crucial relevance in human metabolism of chronic patients. So far, there are no available integrated nano-bio-systems for multi-metabolites, real-time, remote monitoring of the human metabolism. Thus, the aim of this keynote speech is to present innovative concepts for multi-panel, highly integrated, fully implantable, remotely powered and real-time monitoring systems for human metabolism at molecular level. The core of the presented system is an extremely integrated implantable chip that can be seen as a tiny molecular laboratory located under the patient’s skin for providing molecular telemetry. The considered metabolic molecules are glucose, lactate, glutamate, ATP [2], and anticancer drugs as well as anti-inflammatory ones [3]. In case of drugs, the specificity of electrochemical sensors is improved at system level [4]. The proposed nanotechnology is based on carbon nanotubes to improve the sensors performance [3, 5]. To pursue the molecular detection, innovative VLSI solutions [6] are discussed including new ideas on the remote powering [7]. The new approach is obtained by integrating nano/bio/micro/CMOS/SW/RF systems in three devices: (i) a fully implantable sensors array for data acquisition (the tiny laboratory!); (ii) an on-skin intelligent-patch for remote powering and Bluetooth® connections; (iii) a mobile phone for data collection, elaboration, storage, and retransmission. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ [1] Sandro Carrara (Au), Bio/CMOS interfaces and co-design, Springer, New York, 2012 [2] Sandro Carrara, Léandre Bolomey, Cristina Boero, Andrea Cavallini, Eric Meurville, Giovanni De Micheli, Fabio Grassi, Tanja Rezzonico, Remote System for Monitoring Animal Models with Single-Metabolite Bio-Nano-Sensors, IEEE Sensors, 13(2013) 1018-1024 [3] Sandro Carrara, Andrea Cavallini, Victor Erokhin, Giovanni De Micheli, Multi-panel drugs detection in human serum for personalized therapy, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 26 (2011) 3914–3919 [4] Camilla Baj-Rossi, Giovanni De Micheli, Sandro Carrara, Electrochemical Detection of Anti-Breast-Cancer Agents in Human Serum by Cytochrome P450-Coated Carbon Nanotubes, Sensors 12 (2012) 6520-6537 [5] Cristina Boero, Sandro Carrara, Giovanna Del Vecchio, Laura Calzà, Giovanni De Micheli, Highly-Sensitive Carbon Nanotubes-Based Sensing for Glucose and Lactate Monitoring in Cell Culture, IEEE Transaction on Nanobiology, 10(2011) 59-67 [6] S. Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Irene Taurino, Sandro Carrara, and Giovanni De Micheli, A Current-Mode Potentiostat for Multi-Target Detection Tested with Different Lactate Biosensors, IEEE International Conference BioCAS 2012, 28-30 November 2012, Hsinchu, Taiwan, pp. 128 – 131 [7] Jacopo Olivo, Sandro Carrara, and Giovanni De Micheli, A study of Multi-Layer Spiral Inductors for Remote Powering of Implantable Sensors, IEEE Transaction of Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2013, in press



 

 

Dielectric Waveguide Amplifiers and Lasers

Markus Pollnau
University of Twente
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Markus Pollnau received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the Univ. of Hamburg, Germany in 1992 and the Univ. of Bern, Switzerland in 1996, respectively. After positions with the Univ. of Southampton, the Univ. of Bern, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, he became a Full Professor at the Univ. of Twente, The Netherlands. He has contributed to more than 500 reviewed journal and international conference papers and ten book chapters in the fields of crystal and thin-film growth, rare-earth-ion spectroscopy, solid-state and fiber lasers, and waveguide fabrication, devices, and applications. Dr. Pollnau served as Program and General Co-chair of the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (2006/2008) and the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe (2009/2011), founding General Chair of the Europhoton Conference (2004), as well as Topical Editor for the Journal of the Optical Society of America B (2007-2010).


Abstract
The performance of semiconductor amplifiers and lasers has made them the preferred choice for optical gain on a micro-chip. In the past few years, we have demonstrated that also rare-earth-ion-doped dielectric waveguides show remarkable performance, ranging from a small-signal gain per unit length of 1000 dB/cm, via integrated distributed-feedback lasers with ultra-narrow linewidths in the 1-kHz range, to 1.6 W of output power from a fundamental-mode channel waveguide laser with a slope efficiency exceeding 80%. These performance parameters, combined with the distinct advantages of rare-earth ions, their long emission lifetimes, temporally and spatially stable gain, high-speed amplification into the Tb/s regime, reduced time jitter in ultrafast-pulse generation, and reasonably low heat generation, make these dielectric devices viable alternatives that can easily compete with the common semiconductor devices.



 

 

Physiological Computing for Outdoor Activities

António Câmara
YDreams
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
António Câmara is Chief Executive Officer of YDreams and Professor at Universidade Nova de Lisboa. He got a BSc in Civil Engineering at IST (1977) and MSc (1979) and PhD (1982) in Environmental Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. António Câmara was a Post-Doctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Visiting Professor at Cornell University (1988-89) and MIT (1998-99). António Câmara has been a pioneer on geographical information systems research. He published over 150 refereed papers and the "Spatial Multimedia and Virtual Reality" published by Taylor & Francis (1999) and "Environmental Systems" published by Oxford University Press (2002). He is a founder of YDreams, a international leader in interactivity. YDreams has developed more than 600 projects in 25 countries for companies such as Nike, Adidas, Santander, Coca-Cola, NOKIA and Vodafone. The company has received over twenty awards including the Industrial Design Society of America Gold Award for Interactive Environments in 2004, and the Auggies, Augmented Reality's Oscar, in 2010. YDreams projects and products have been profiled in the New York Times, Guardian, Liberation, El Pais, Business Week, Economist, Wired, Engadaget, Gizmodo, CNN and CNBC. António Câmara has received several national and international awards, namely Premio Pessoa in 2006.


Abstract
Physiological computing for outdoor activities may involve data collection from sensors, local actuators, a communications infra structure, and processing. User interface design is mostly centered on sensor, sensor-actuator, and computing devices, both mobile and fixed. For illustrative purposes two case studies are presented: the development of an infrastructure for firemen; and the application of physiological computing to football.



 

 

Human Sensors - Perspectives on the Digital Self

Stephen Fairclough
Liverpool John Moores University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Stephen Fairclough is a Professor of Psychophysiology at Liverpool John Moores University. He received his PhD from Loughborough University where he was part of a human factors group working on the development of in-vehicle technology. His work focused on the monitoring of driver impairment due to sleepiness and the development of systems designed to detect impairment. This work involved collaboration with a number of car companies (Ford Europe, Renault) and involved the development of psychophysiological and behavioural markers of driver impairment. Since joining LJMU, he has focused on physiological computing systems where physiological data is used as control input for technological systems. He was funded by EPSRC to investigate the use of psychophysiology for the control of adaptive automation in an aviation environment. He has also participated in EU-funded projects such as REFLECT where physiological computing systems were developed for vehicle environments and ARTSENSE which took the same approach into a cultural heritage domain. His work has been presented at a range of conferences, from the Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research to IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation. He has published research in journals spanning psychology (International Journal of Psychophysiology, Psychophysiology, Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine) and computer science (Interacting with Computers, ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems, International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communication Systems). His 2009 paper in Interacting With Computers has won the most-cited paper award in that journal for the last two years. He has served as President-Elect of Psychophysiology In Ergonomics (PIE), organised international symposia at Triennial Meetings of the International Ergonomics Association; he also co-edited a special issue of the journal Applied Ergonomics on psychophysiological research. He has organised workshops on physiological computing at several international conferences, such as CHI'11 (Brain and Body Interfaces) and ICMI'12 (Brain-Computer Interfaces as Intelligent Interaction). He has also co-edited a collection of research on physiological computing (Advances in Physiological Computing) for Springer. Research page available at: www.shfairclough.com


Abstract
The availability of ambulatory sensors has created the potential to capture both overt and covert aspects of human physiology. The interpretation of data is a real challenge for this field, especially if we move towards multidimensional representations of behaviour. This talk is concerned with the concept of the digital self as a representation of behaviour that is generated by real-time monitoring of human physiology.Research on several applications related to the digital self and physiological computing will be described including: using physiology to tag experience, physiological monitoring to gain insight into the self and using these data to enable intelligent software interaction. The potential to aggregate data from the digital self to represent the behaviour of groups is also explored with reference to shared experience, digital memories and the use of populations as monitors. This digital self can be used to drive interactions with technology or used for the purpose of introspection and self-regulation. The practical benefits of the digital self (enabling smart technology, monitoring the vulnerable) are contrasted with the potential for disruptive psychological effects (a divided view of the self).



 

 

Security Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks

Utz Roedig
Lancaster University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Dr Utz Roedig is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University, UK. He received his Ph.D. degree (Dr.-Ing.) from Darmstadt University of Technology in 2002. His research interests lie in the area of wireless sensor networks, in particular he is interested in security and performance aspects. His recent research projects investigate wireless sensor network applications such as physical intrusion detection, traffic management, home automation and industrial process automation and control. Dr Roedig is a founding member of Security Lancaster, a Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Research awarded by GCHQ and the EPSRC. He has been co-chair and organiser of various sensor network conferences and workshops such as PWSN 2013 (in conjunction with DCOSS), EWSN 2009 and SenseApp 2007 (held in conjunction with LCN). Dr Roedig is regular TPC member of leading conferences such as EWSN, IPSN and SenSys and he has published over 100 research papers.


Abstract
We depend on Wireless Sensor Networks in our daily life. For instance, such systems are used for building automation, traffic management, process automation in factories and plants and are used to monitor patients in hospitals. It is therefore necessary to implement security mechanisms for these systems to ensure resilience against attacks and to prevent misuse. For example, you would like to prevent your neighbour from switching on and off the lights within your smart home. In this talk I will first discuss the general security challenges in wireless sensor networks. In particular, I intend to describe why it is difficult to transfer existing security mechanisms into the wireless sensor network domain. Current security WSN research challenges are outlined and open research questions and areas that require attention are highlighted. My recent work has addressed some of the open issues. I want to show you how WSNs can be interconnected securely with the Internet using 6LowPAN extensions for IPSec. Furthermore, I will describe how secure data storage on sensor nodes can be implemented and integrated with secure communication to provide true end-to-end security. The keynote shall conclude with a discussion on novel security mechanisms such as distance based authentication and wireless firewalls and I will show how these mechanisms can be implemented and how they may help to secure future WSN deployments.



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