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Keynote Lectures

Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Information Fusion – An Overview of the Triad Underlying Emerging Information Networks
Belur V. Dasarathy, Information Fusion, United States

Killer-mobiles - The Way Towards Energy Efficient High Performance Computers?
Mateo Valero, Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya, Spain

Predictability and Mixed Criticality
Alan Burns, University of York, United Kingdom

Wireless Sensor Networks for Home Health Care
John Stankovic, University of Virginia, United States

The Gap between Specification and Synthesis
Stephen Mellor, Freeter, United Kingdom

A Perspective of the Networks of the Future and Smart Cities
Luis M. Correia, IST/IT-Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal

Quantitative Fitness Measures for Embedded Systems
Thomas Henzinger, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Austria

 

Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Information Fusion – An Overview of the Triad Underlying Emerging Information Networks

Belur V. Dasarathy
Information Fusion
United States
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Belur V. Dasarathy, an IEEE Fellow, is an independent consultant offering services to commercial and government clients in the design and development of automated intelligent decision systems arising in a variety of applications. His expertise includes guidance, teaching, research and development (R&D) and R&D management in the areas of intelligent decision systems, learning systems, multi-sensor multi-source information fusion, knowledge discovery through pattern recognition and data mining, image analysis and other related topics. His prior professional full-time affiliations have included Dynetics, Inc., Intergraph Corp., Computer Sciences Corp., Indian Institute of Science, Southern Methodist University, as well as adjunct positions at University of Alabama in Huntsville.
He is the founding Editor-in-chief of the International Journal on Information Fusion published by Elsevier Science, the very first journal dedicated to this evolving field. He has offered short courses in the information fusion arena under SPIE and other conference sponsorships as well as under individual company/ University/ Organization sponsored on-site programs.
Dr. Dasarathy has over 180 open literature publications with him as primary author in majority of these publications. He is the author of three IEEE Computer Society Press books: Decision Fusion, Nearest Neighbor (NN) Norms: NN Pattern Classification Techniques, and Image Data Compression: Block Truncation Coding. He has also contributed chapters/sections to other books, including one in the handbook on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (Oxford University Press, 2002). His publications have been cited in the literature in over 400 studies.
He has been an invited speaker at many national and international conferences over the past decade such as 2nd Intl Conference on Sensor Networks (SENSORNETS 2013), Spain;3rd International Conference on Pervasive and Embedded Computing and Communication Systems (PECCS 2013), Spain; 6th International Symposium on Intelligent Distributed Computing 2012, Italy; 16th Annual KES Conference, 2012 Spain; IDGA 9th Annual Image Fusion Summit, 2010, USA; 2008 International Conference on Aerospace Science and Technology, India; 2008 Indo-US Workshop on Regional Air Transportation, India; 2nd International Conference on Information  Security and  Assurance, 2008, Korea; Future Generation Communication and Networking, 2007 Korea; 2006 IDGA Conference on Night Vision Systems, Washington, DC; 2006 IEEE Intl Conf on Multisensor Fusion and Integration for Intelligent Systems, Germany; 2006 Biologically Inspired Information Fusion, UK; ISSNIP ’04 Australia; International Conference on Human-Machine Interface 2004, India; IEEE International Conference on Computational Cybernetics ICCC’04 Austria; The 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, ICAR Portugal; International Workshop on Information Fusion 2002, China; IX Spanish Symposium on Pattern Recognition and Image Processing 2001, Spain; IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology, ICIT 2000, India; International Conference on Applications of Pattern Recognition 1998, England.
Dr. Dasarathy was honored as the IEEE Huntsville Section Outstanding Engineer 1996, IEEE Region 3 Outstanding Engineer for 1997 and a recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. He was one of the founding members of the board of directors of the International Society on Information Fusion (ISIF) and served on it for three years. He was the guest editor of Optical Engineering for three special sections on Sensor Fusion. From 1997 to 2009, he has been the organizer & chairman of two annual SPIE Conferences on multi-sensor, multi-source information fusion and data mining, intrusion detection & network security. He was the publicity chair for the International conferences on Information Fusion - Fusion 1998, Fusion 1999, Fusion 2001, a member of the executive committee of Fusion 2000, and is a member of the International Program committee for Fusion 2003. He has organized and chaired special sessions on Information Fusion and Data Mining at other conferences including IEEE Decision and Control 1998, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks 1999, IGARSS 2000, IECON-2000. He has been a member of the Scientific Committee for the annual workshop on Multiple Classifier Systems since 2000 including the one to be held in 2003. He was also the technical vice-chair for Autotestcon 2002.
His biographical citations include: International Who's Who in Information Technology, 1999; "The Official Registry of the Who' Who of American Business Leaders," 1991; ; "Who's Who in the South and Southwest," 22nd Edition, 1991; Who's Who in Technology Today," Dick Publishing 5th Edition, "Personalities of the South," American Biographical Institute, 1986; "WHO' WHO" in Computer Graphics," Marquis, 1984, etc.


Abstract
The objective of this keynote address is to bring to focus the positive role information fusion can play in the context of applications involving sensor networks, and ubiquitous computing. The presentation will begin with a brief introduction to each of the three topics: sensor networks, ubiquitous computing, and information fusion. This will include a brief overview of sensor network characteristics, its taxonomy, and performance metrics. This is followed by an overview of the elements of human-computer interaction (HCI) that are essential to ubiquitous computing.  The similarities as well as contrasting, but complementary, capabilities of the man and machine will be reviewed. Next an overview of information fusion is presented to show how it can aid the objectives of the sensor networks with pervasive and embedded computing capabilities.  Towards this end, a global, flexible Information fusion architecture model, which can maximize the overall opportunity for synergistic exploitation of the potentials of sensor network and ubiquitous computing, will be presented and discussed in greater detail.



 

 

Killer-mobiles - The Way Towards Energy Efficient High Performance Computers?

Mateo Valero
Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya
Spain
 

Brief Bio

Mateo Valero, http://www.bsc.es/cv-mateo/, obtained his Telecommunication Engineering Degree from the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) in 1974 and his Ph.D. in Telecommunications from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in 1980. He is a professor in the Computer Architecture Department at UPC, in Barcelona. His research interests focuses on high performance architectures. He has published approximately 700 papers, has served in the organization of more than 300 International Conferences and he has given more than 400 invited talks. He is the director of the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, the National Centre of Supercomputing in Spain.
Dr. Valero has been honoured with several awards. Among them, the Eckert-Mauchly Award 2007 by the IEEE and ACM; Seymour Cray Award 2015 by IEEE;  Harry Goode Award 2009 by IEEE: ACM Distinguished Service Award 2012; Euro-Par Achievement Award 2015; the Spanish National Julio Rey Pastor award, in recognition of research in Mathematics; the Spanish National Award “Leonardo Torres Quevedo” that recognizes research in engineering;  the “King Jaime I” in basic research given by Generalitat Valenciana; the  Research Award by the Catalan Foundation for Research and Innovation and the “Aragón Award” 2008  given by the Government of Aragón. He has been named Honorary Doctor by the University of Chalmers, by the University of Belgrade, by the Universities of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Zaragoza, Complutense de Madrid, Cantabria and Granada in Spain and by the University of Veracruz in Mexico.  "Hall of the Fame" member of the ICT European Program (selected as one of the 25 most influents European researchers in IT during the period 1983-2008. Lyon,November 2008); Honoured with Creu de Sant Jordi 2016 by Generalitat de Catalunya. It is the highest recognition granted by the Government.
In December 1994, Professor Valero became a founding member of the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2005 he was elected Correspondant Academic of the Spanish Royal Academy of Science, in 2006  member of the Royal Spanish Academy of Doctors, in 2008 member of the Academia Europaea and in 2012 Correspondant Academic of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, Fellow of the ACM and an Intel Distinguished Research Fellow. 
In 1998 he won a “Favourite Son” Award of his home town, Alfamén (Zaragoza) and in 2006, his native town of Alfamén named their Public College after him. 


Abstract
It is widely recognized that Exascale systems will be constrained by power. The Mont-Blanc project aims to build an alternative approach towards Exascale based on aggregating parts from the embedded and mobile market, which offer a better FLOPS/Watt ratio and a lower unit cost, at the expense of lower peak performance per chip. HPC systems built from these parts will require a higher number of processors, or resort to extensive use of compute accelerators. Using a higher number of chips increases the available memory bandwidth, alleviating the bandwidth wall, but increases the pressure on the interconnection network.

The use of a high number of processors and accelerators, and the increased pressure on the interconnect require extensive code optimizations to achieve strong scaling, point to point synchronizations, and overlap data transfer with computation. The role of the OmpSs parallel programming model is paramount, as the key enabling technology that hides the complexity from the programmer, and transparently performs all the required optimizations.

 In this talk, we will review the design philosophies of several vendors, including HPC compute accelerators, and ARM-based mobile application processors in terms of peak performance, memory bandwidth, and energy efficiency; and we will review how the OmpSs programming models exploits the benefits of the Mont-Blanc approach while overcoming the drawbacks.



 

 

Predictability and Mixed Criticality

Alan Burns
University of York
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Professor Alan Burns a member of the Department of Computer Science, University of York, U.K. His research interests cover a number of aspects of real-time systems including the assessment of languages for use in the real-time domain, distributed operating systems, the formal specification of scheduling algorithms and implementation strategies, and the design of dependable user interfaces to real-time applications. Professor Burns has authored/co-authored 450 papers/reports and 15 books. Many of these are in the real-time area. His teaching activities include courses in Operating Systems and Real-time Systems. He is a member of ARTIST - the EU Centre of Excellence in Real-Time and Embedded Systems. In 2009 Professor Burns was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the IEEE.


Abstract
This talk will address and link two currently active research topics. The first is the need to deliver time predictable behaviour in software intensive embedded systems such as those identified in the Cyber Physical domains. It is usually argued that predicable systems can only be built from predictable and deterministic components. Here we argue for predictability to viewed as an emergent property at the time granularity (or band) required. The second topic is mixed criticality systems (MCS) - here a disciplined approach to partitioning (for safety) and sharing (for efficient resource sharing) is required. A short review on MCS will be given. To conclude we shall explore the link between predictability and criticality.



 

 

Wireless Sensor Networks for Home Health Care

John Stankovic
University of Virginia
United States
 

Brief Bio
Professor John A. Stankovic is the BP America Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Virginia. He served as Chair of the department, completing two terms (8 years).  He is a Fellow of both the IEEE and the ACM. He won the IEEE Real-Time Systems Technical Committee's Award for Outstanding Technical Contributions and Leadership. He also won the IEEE Distributed Processing Technical Committee’s Award for Distinguished Achievement (inaugural winner). He has won five best paper awards in wireless sensor networks research. He is highly cited (h-index is 92) and presented many Invited Keynotes and Distinguished Lectures. Professor Stankovic also served on the Board of Directors of the Computer Research Association for 9 years. Currently, he serves on the National Academy’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Recently, he won the University of Virginia, School of Engineering Distinguished Faculty Award. Before joining the University of Virginia, Professor Stankovic taught at the University of Massachusetts where he won an outstanding scholar award. He was the Editor-in-Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Distributed and Parallel Systems and was a founder and co-editor-in-chief for the Real-Time Systems Journal. His research interests are in wireless sensor networks, cyber physical systems, distributed computing, and real-time systems. Prof. Stankovic received his PhD from Brown University.


Abstract
Wireless sensor networks (WSN) composed of large numbers of small devices can be used for a wide variety of applications. In particular, these systems can be used to improve the quality of health care, be applied in the home or in large-scale assisted living facilities, and significantly contribute to longitudinal studies. After briefly describing a vision and architecture for such systems, I will present several applications of this technology, including human depression detection, support for dementia patients with incontinence, and learning the relationship between stress and epilepsy seizures. I will then present results on some of our recent research work regarding the underlying technology to achieve these applications, including: robust activity detection, semantic anomaly detection, sleep monitoring, and privacy.   Open research questions will be mentioned throughout the talk.



 

 

The Gap between Specification and Synthesis

Stephen Mellor
Freeter
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Stephen J Mellor is an independent teacher and consultant focussed on methods for the construction of real-time and embedded systems. He is the author of Structured Development for Real-Time Systems (way back in 1985), Object Lifecycles, Executable UML, and MDA Distilled. He is also (perhaps surprisingly) a signatory to the Agile Manifesto. Until recently, he was Chief Scientist of the Embedded Software Division at Mentor Graphics, and founder and some-time president of Project Technology, Inc., before its acquisition. He participates in multiple UML/modeling related activities at the Object Management Group, and was a member of the OMG's Architecture Board, which is the final technical gateway for all OMG standards. Mr. Mellor was the Chairman of the Advisory Board to IEEE Software for ten years and a two-time Guest Editor of the magazine, most recently for an issue on Model-Driven Development. He is also adjunct professor at the Australian National University in Canberra, ACT, Australia.


Abstract
Whenever we build an abstract specification language, we lose some control over that which we have abstracted away.  This poses difficulties when we desire such control, but are unwilling to lose the undoubted benefits of an abstract specification language. This problem is greater when the gap between the specification and the eventual implementation is large, which is especially the case when defining the functional behaviour of an SoC, that, by definition, involves both hardware and software. At this stage, the differentiation between hardware and software has not (or should not have!) been made, and the specification of software or hardware optimisations is premature.

This keynote proposes an approach using models to capture the behaviour of the system including both hardware and software, and transformations to synthesise the system. In this way, optimisations can be embedded within the transformations and so close the gap between specification and synthesis in a general manner.



 

 

A Perspective of the Networks of the Future and Smart Cities

Luis M. Correia
IST/IT-Technical University of Lisbon
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Luis M. Correia was born in Portugal, on 1958.  He received the Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from IST (Technical University of Lisbon) in 1991, where he is currently a Professor in Telecommunications, with his work focused in Wireless/Mobile Communications in the areas of propagation, channel characterisation, radio networks, traffic, and applications, with the research activities developed in the INOV-INESC institute.  He has acted as a consultant for Portuguese mobile communications operators and the telecommunications regulator, besides other public and private entities.  Besides being responsible for research projects at the national level, he has been active in various ones within the European frameworks of RACE, ACTS, IST, ICT and COST (where he also served as evaluator and auditor), having coordinated two COST projects, and taken leadership responsibilities at various levels in many others.  He has supervised more than 150 M.Sc. and Ph.D. students, having authored more than 350 papers in international and national journals and conferences, for which he has served also as a reviewer, editor, and board member, and edited 6 books.  He was part of the COST Domain Committee on ICT.  He was the Chairman of the Technical Programme Committee of several major conferences, and is part of several Steering Boards.  He is part of the Expert Advisory Group and of the Steering Board of the European Net!Works platform, and was the Chairman of its Working Group on Applications.


Abstract
A parallel in the evolution between mobile and wireless communications and other areas (computers and cars) will be presented, in an attempt to identify possible directions for systems future evolution.  A look into already existing technologies will enable to establish a perspective for future user interface devices and services (e.g., information access, Internet of Things, and geo-location).  Then, potential services are identified, after which research challenges for mobile and wireless communications networks are addressed (e.g., network virtualisation, cloud networking, and networks of information).  Smart Cities are taken as an integration example, as well as a perspective of application to other key sectors (e.g., health, transport, and energy). The link with other areas, and impact on regulation, standardisation, and policy matters are presented at the end.



 

 

Quantitative Fitness Measures for Embedded Systems

Thomas Henzinger
Institute of Science and Technology Austria
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Thomas A. Henzinger is President of IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria). He holds a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Computer Science from Kepler University in Linz, Austria, an M.S. degree in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Delaware, a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Stanford University (1991), and a Dr.h.c. degree from Fourier University in Grenoble, France. He was Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University (1992-95), Assistant Professor (1996-97), Associate Professor (1997-98), and Professor (1998-2004) of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He was also Director at the Max-Planck Institute for Computer Science in Saarbruecken, Germany (1999) and Professor of Computer and Communication Sciences at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland (2004-09). His research focuses on modern systems theory, especially models, algorithms, and tools for the design and verification of reliable software, hardware, and embedded systems. His HyTech tool was the first model checker for mixed discrete-continuous systems. He is an ISI highly cited researcher, a member of Academia Europaea, a member of the German Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina), a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the ACM, and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has received the Wittgenstein Award of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Grant.


Abstract

Formal verification aims to improve the quality of hardware and software by detecting errors before they do harm.  At the basis of formal verification lies the logical notion of correctness, which purports to capture whether or not a circuit, program, or system behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition into correct and incorrect systems falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of systems in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria.  Among all systems that are correct with respect to a given set of requirements, usually some are preferred over others; and among all incorrect systems, some are more acceptable than others.
We advocate quantitative fitness measures for systems, for measuring various aspects of function, performance, and robustness.  We survey several quantitative theories of systems: they may be probabilistic; they may refer to the consumption of resources such as time, space, and power; they may measure failures and reliability; and most abstractly, they may measure how close a system comes to satisfying a requirement, and how much a system can be perturbed without violating the requirement.  Synthesis, which in a qualitative setting is a constraint satisfaction problem, becomes then an optimization problem, which asks for the automatic construction of the preferred system.



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